Do what you can’t

This palyboard symbolizes a well-known play " Snakeladder". The drawing has been improved with the details of computer games and many other items inviting to break the rules of the game. The drawing depicts the hereos of the play who are the symbols of two different sides of the behaviour: a good and a bad one. A little person hanging on a dice and playing according to the rules of the game, loses. Wherereas, a skeleton, breaking the rules of the game, rises upwards till the end of the game. Namely this understanding symbolizes the title of the game "Do what you can't (Lith. Daryk tai, kas negalima)". The picture is drawn on the wall of a school building and depicts the idea of contemporary often riotuos youth which constatntly breaks the rules and does what is not allowed.

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Anonymity of the crowd

In a crowd, we become invisible. We are free to expose our true nature without fear. This can be profoundly and creatively liberating. It can also conceal, and reveal, darker natures.

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Flock of doves

Will Teather is internationally known for creating artworks that are both refreshingly contemporary, otherworldly and rooted in the medium's rich and complex traditions. " Flock" is intended to depict an impossible viewpoint, as if the viewer is stood in the middle of a flock of birds. The composition creates an immersive experience for the viewer through both the perspective and scale of the composition. The artist has always been drawn to the sense of spectacle associated with birds and their inherent symbolism, with doves being a symbol of peace.

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Bus Stop

On the right side of the wall the artist depicted his remarkable assistants from Marijampole, without whose help he would never been able to finish the mural. The left side of the wall is dedicated to famous US singersongwriter Bob Dylan, riding a motorcycle. In the middle of the wall sitting on a bench and waiting for the bus to Vilkaviskis is another world famous singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen. Both Dylan's and Cohen's family roots reach back to this part of the world, called Suvalkija. The alien playing cello is settled here from another beloved mural by Ray Bartkus "Alien Symphony" created during Malonny 1 and unfortunately destroyed.

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The Wall of Cats

M. Ragelous's works can be characterized by magnifying small and individual details, which at the end creates fascinating view. However, she changed her idea after seeing Marijampolė and hearing the story about the square of cats. Before hearing the story, she imagined some kind of mystic characters on the wall, but afterwards she drew cats and birds to depict fragments of the history of Marijampolė and the Countess Butlerienė love for cats.

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Arctic

Arctic This impressive size mural symbolizes the melting of glaciers, changes…

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St. George and The King of Ethiopia

Saint George slaying the dragon, a reinterpreted Christian legend, is an iconography that is recognized throughout the City of Marijampole. This same symbol has been used by Rastafarian artist Neville Garrick depicting Reggae legend Bob Marley as an Ethiopian St. George. This apparent metaphor for good conquering evil is shared from Lithuania to Ethiopia and Jamaica. Additionally, the Rastafarian movement uses the Ethiopian flag's color sequences as their own color symbols. Interestingly the same flag colors, albeit different color sequence is that of Lithuania's. It is these coincidental elements that brought forth the conversation depicted by Elysée's mural.

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Landscape of Emotions

This wall painting is based on a piece of crumpled paper. Many Tints of grey, black and white match facets in the damaged paper. The pattern resembles a cross-section of granite or other crystalline rock, the starting point is something quite fragile. A crumpled piece of paper is usually thrown away, considered a failure. But often mistakes can open up new pathways. The „wrong” way may turn out to be much more interesting than the original, intended destination. The damage done to a piece of paper is irreversible, therefore it's impossible to make it smooth again once it's been crumpled. Similarly, other forms of damage, psychological, historical or geological, may also be impossible to repair; they remain hidden while at the same time giving shape to the visible landscape.

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